Breast Cancer Statistics

Breast Cancer Statistics

National Statistics

General Statistics

  • It is estimated that 232,340 women and 2,240 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013 and an estimated 39,620 women will die from the disease. [1]
  • On January 1, 2009, in the United States there were approximately 2,747,459 women alive who had a history of cancer of the breast. [1]
  • Half of all female breast cancer patients receive their diagnosis by age 61 and approximately 12% are diagnosed before age 45. [2]

Incidence Rates

  • From 2006-2010, the median age at diagnosis for cancer of the breast was 61 years of age. [1]
  • Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, excluding cancers of the skin, accounting for nearly 33% cancers diagnosed in U.S. women.[3]
  • Breast cancer occurs in men as well, accounting for 1% of all breast cancer diagnoses. [3]
  • Based on rates from 2007-2009, 12.38% of women born today will be diagnosed with cancer of the breast at some time during their lifetime. This number can also be expressed as 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime. [4]

View National Incidence Rates by Age

Incidence by Age Graph

This figure demonstrates breast cancer incidence rates by age category using the average incidence rates from 2006-2010. Data was retrieved from http://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/breast.html

View National Incidence Rates by Race/Ethnicity

Female BC Rates by Race-Ethnicity From IBERCC ReportChart from “Breast Cancer and the Environment: Prioritizing Prevention,” released by the Interagency Breast Cancer and Environment Research Coordinating Committee in February 2013.

Mortality Rates

  • Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women, behind lung cancer.  [3]
  • In 2011, approximately 39,620  women and 410 men are expected to die from breast cancer. [3]

View National Mortality Rates by Race/Ethnicity

Female BC Deaths by Race-Ethnicity from IBERCC ReportChart from “Breast Cancer and the Environment: Prioritizing Prevention,” released by the Interagency Breast Cancer and Environment Research Coordinating Committee in February 2013.

Massachusetts Statistics

MA Incidence Rates

  • From 2004 to 2008, invasive breast cancer was the most common type of newly diagnosed cancer among Massachusetts females, accounting for 28.5% of new cancers among females. [5]
  • By county, rates of breast cancer range in MA from a low of 120.2 in Suffolk County (Boston area) to a high of 152.1 in Dukes County (Martha’s Vineyard). The highest rates in MA are on Cape Cod (Dukes, Nantucket, and Barnstable Counties) and slightly lower rates are found in Middlesex, Hampshire, Norfolk, and Franklin Counties. [5]

MA Incidence Rates Compared to National Rates

  • In 2008, Massachusetts had the highest incidence rate of breast cancer in the United States. [6]
  • According to 2009 statistics (which is the latest data available from the CDC), Massachusetts breast cancer incidence is approximately 5.8% higher than the national average. [6]
  • National data for 2009 reports an incidence rate for breast cancer at 130.3 per 100,000 women in MA compared to an average rate of 123.1 for the U.S. as a whole. MA is in the top quartile of incidence for breast cancer in the U.S., a group that includes, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Washington. [7]

View National vs. MA Incidence Rates

MA Incidence Rate GraphThis figure displays a comparison of national and Massachusetts breast cancer incidence rates between the years of 1999 and 2009. The data was retrieved from http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/uscs/cancersrankedbystate.aspx.

Causes & Risk Factors

  • Many risk factors for breast cancer are related to prolonged exposure to estrogen and other hormones that play a role in a woman’s menstrual cycle. These risk factors include early menarche, late menopause, having children late in life, never bearing children, and never breastfeeding. [8]
  • About 85% of breast cancers occur in women who have no family history of the disease. [9]
  • Only about 5-10% of breast cancer cases can be linked to gene mutations inherited from one’s mother or father (including BRCA1, BRCA2, and others). [10]
  • Over 84,000 chemicals are currently registered for use in the United States. We have complete toxicological screening data for only 7% of these chemicals. [10]

Breast Cancer Funding & Financial Burden

  • The most recent projected 2012 national cost of breast cancer in the United States was over $17 billion. [10]
  • Only approximately 10-11% of federally funded breast cancer research projects (by the National Institute of Health and Department of Defense) focus on environmental health. [10]
  • Less than 7% of Non-Governmental Organization funding (non-profits and others) goes towards research specifically on breast cancer prevention. [10]

 

References

[1] National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program http://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/breast.html[2] National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program  http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2009_pops09/[3] American Cancer Society (ACS) Breast Cancer Facts and Figures 2011-2012 http://www.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/breastcancerfactsfigures/breast-cancer-facts-and-figures-2011-2012

[4] State Cancer Profiles (data from the National Program of Cancer Registries Cancer Surveillance System, CDC and by the NCI’s SEER Program) http://statecancerprofiles.cancer.gov/incidencerates/

[5] Cancer Incidence And Mortality In Massachusetts 2004-2008: Statewide Report, Mass. Dept. of Public Health http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/docs/dph/cancer/registry-statewide-04-08-report.pdf

[6] Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/uscs/

[7] State Cancer Profiles (data from the National Program of Cancer Registries Cancer Surveillance System, CDC and by the NCI’s SEER Program) http://statecancerprofiles.cancer.gov/cgi-bin/quickprofiles/profile.pl?00&055

[8] Silent Spring Institute. Risk Factors for Breast Cancer. http://www.silentspring.org/faqs/risk-factors-breast-cancer

[9] http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/understand_bc/statistics.jsp

[10] Interagency Breast Cancer and Environment Research Coordinating Committee (IBCERCC), Breast Cancer and the Environment: Prioritizing Prevention. http://www.niehs.nih.gov/about/assets/docs/ibcercc_full.pdf

 


Updated April 2014